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Let's Jiak Laksa Review: Flavoursome dry laksa from a home-based business

Let's Jiak Laksa Review: Flavoursome dry laksa from a home-based business

Let's Jiak Laksa Review: Flavoursome dry laksa from a home-based business

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Earlier this week, our team ordered dry laksa from home eatery, Let’s Jiak, for lunch.

Our packaging arrived with these neatly garnished bento bowls. Let’s Jiak uses thick vermicelli for their dry laksa, which is wok-fried with their secret recipe laksa sauce. The fragrance hit me as soon as I opened the lid! 

let's jiak dry laksa

The laksa is interestingly fried dry, there’s barely a trace of gravy to be seen. I somehow have had the impression that thick vermicelli doesn’t absorb flavours well. But on the first bite, the vermicelli is surprisingly flavourful! You can see that the sauce has clung onto the noodles, tingeing the white strands brown.

I thought the prominence of laksa leaves is the most apparent, followed by a rounded coconut milk flavour. For a colleague, the hei bee hiam taste is the flavour front runner. 

The noodles are also fried with a generous amount of bean sprouts, julienned tau pok and fishcake. They camouflage quite well with the noodles, but you’ll get them in every bite. The prawns are large, fresh and even peeled!

let's jiak dry laksa

Now, I know dry laksa is not a common dish, so you may be wondering how exactly it tastes like. I think it tastes exactly like the soup version. Picture placing a few strands of vermicelli onto the spoon and topping it off with a slice of taupok and fishcake, then dousing the spoonful with broth. That’s the taste, except texturally, it’s dry, almost paste-like, instead of wet. If it sounds trippy, I assure you that tasting it firsthand is no less mind-boggling! It certainly takes some getting used to. 

So what’s the verdict? The vermicelli held its texture after a few hours and Let’s Jiak did a stellar job at infusing a strong laksa flavour into the noodles. Personally, I loved the stronger-than-usual laksa leaf flavour. It’s also a big bonus to get tau pok and fishcake in almost every bite of the noodles! I do however find myself preferring the soup version, since I’ve never had laksa dry before (it’s a wholly subjective preference!). 

Perhaps in part due to the large amount of hei bee hiam they use in the laksa, lunch left me a little thirsty. 

let's jiak dry laksa
I can picture people clamouring for Let's Jiak dry laksa because the flavours are really on point! If you like gao flavours or prefer dry noodles, you’ll have to give Let’s Jiak dry laksa a try.

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